Afro Indo Unity: Can The Ganges Ever Meet The Nile? Conclusion

Afro Indo Unity: Can The Ganges Ever Meet The Nile? Conclusion

By N Oji Mzilikazi

March 22, 2012

(Originally published in the Montreal Community Contact Volume 22, Number 05)

History informs. The past laid the foundation for personal, even national character, attitudes and dynamics.

The study of the past enlightens. It opens the door to understanding root causes of both the current positives and or negatives of a people, the society or conflict. It allows us to come to terms with ourselves, positions one to eliminate misconceptions, put things in perspective, demystify and quite possibly reduce bias and prejudice…

 

Afro Indo Unity: Can The Ganges Ever Meet The Nile? Part 3

Afro Indo Unity: Can The Ganges Ever Meet The Nile? Part 3

By N Oji Mzilikazi

December 20, 2011

(Originally published in Montreal Community Contact Volume 21, Number 26)

After the destruction of Jerusalem, Jews were dispersed all over the world. For centuries they were expelled from different countries; kicked from pillar to post, murdered, executed, and even forced to embrace Islam and Christianity.

Throughout their centuries of trials and tribulations, the Torah and Talmud were the keepers of their soul. It kept them united. It kept their culture and language alive. It empowered them towards the goal of freedom, cultural and religious preservation, and the desire to return to their homeland.

On the other hand, Africans enslaved and brought to the New World were deliberately stripped of religion, language and culture- things that are psychologically sustaining, and within which are elements intrinsic to positivity of race, self-affirmation and self-respect…

 

Afro Indo Unity: Can The Ganges Ever Meet The Nile? Part 2

Afro Indo Unity: Can The Ganges Ever Meet The Nile? Part 2

By N Oji Mzilikazi

December 8, 2011

(Originally published in Montreal Community Contact Volume 21, Number 25)

In “Trini 2 De Bone,” David Rudder’s 2003 paean to Trinibago, there is a telling line, “How we vote is not how we party.” Applicable to Guyana as well, that line encapsulates the underlying division and discord between Indo and Afro West Indians.

As much as members of both ethnicities party together, work alongside one other, partake of the culinary culture of the other, cohabitate, intermarry and have children with each other, when it comes to elections, Apan Jhaat – Hindi for “vote for your own kind” rules – irrespective to religious differences or long-standing religious hatred.

In the Indian sub-continent: Hindu India, Muslim Pakistan and Sikhs cannot stand one other.  They have continually engaged in acts of aggression and terrorism against one another and frequently threaten each other with war…

 

 

 

 

 

Afro Indo Unity: Can The Ganges Ever Meet The Nile? Part 1

Afro Indo Unity: Can The Ganges Ever Meet The Nile? Part 1

By N Oji Mzilikazi

November 24, 2011

(Originally published in Montreal Community Contact Volume 21, Number 24)

In the article, “Where Did Black Power Go?” in the previous issue of this newspaper, I mentioned that for more than 160 years the meandering paths of the Ganges and the Nile in the West Indies resulted in an inter-connected narrative. Lamented was that distrust, tribalism and ethnocentrism continued to colour the relationship between former African slaves and former indentured East Indians with virulent strains in Trinidad and Guyana…